Study Evaluates Effect Of Increasing Detection Intervals In Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

From: Red Orbit

Programming an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) with a long-detection interval compared with a standard-detection interval resulted in a reduction in anti-tachycardia pacing episodes, ICD shocks delivered, and inappropriate shocks, according to a study in the May 8 issue of JAMA.

“Therapy with ICDs is now the standard of care in primary and secondary prevention. As indications for implants have expanded, concern about possible adverse effects of ICD therapies on prognosis and quality of life has arisen. Several authors have reported that ICD therapies, both appropriate and inappropriate, are associated with an increased risk of death and worsening of heart failure. To reduce these unfavorable outcomes, several studies have focused on identifying the best device programming strategies, either by targeting the anti-tachycardia pacing [ATP; use of pacing stimulation techniques for termination of tachyarrhythmias] algorithms for interrupting fast ventricular tachyarrhythmias [abnormal heart rhythm] or by investigating the use of prolonged arrhythmia detection intervals,” according to background information in the article. “Using more intervals to detect ventricular tachyarrhythmias has been associated with reducing unnecessary ICD therapies.”

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