Nursing home CPR policy put into question

From: Meridian Booster

When Marie Kube admitted her father at the Dr. Cooke Nursing Home she expected that hospital staff would administer CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) in case of an emergency.

However during a family meeting held every six months, Kube, herself a practical nurse of 37 years, says staff members informed her CPR is not administered there. “When my dad was admitted there we were not informed that they do not do CPR and that just put me in a tailspin when we had a family meeting a couple of weeks ago [and discussed] that they do not administer CPR there,” she said. Calls to the Doctor Cooke Nursing Home were directed to Joan Zimmer, director of continuing care for the Prairie North Regional Health Authority. Zimmer said there are indeed non-CPR facilities in North Battleford, but that is because the patients in those particular facilities are very frail and performing CPR could do more harm than good. Zimmer added the staff at Dr. Cooke are trained in CPR and believes Kube got confused with the facility’s health directives, which include different levels of care administered to each resident depending on their medical condition. For example Degree Two states:

“Supportive nursing care in the facility or at home, relief of pain, adequate oral fluids, fever control and symptom management. Therapeutic measures within the limits of the home or facility, including hydration for the purpose of administering pain relief or antibiotics. This does not include CPR.” CPR, however, is included in Degree Four when the patient is on the way to acute care:

“Maximum life-saving effort including transport to acute care and for CPR on the way and in acute care. Stabilize in acute care, establish a prognosis and have further decisions made by myself (the relative) or my proxy in consultation with the medical team.”

Kube was also surprised to learn the facility is not equipped with AEDs (Automatic Electronic Defibrillators).

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