Public Programs

 

The following listings provide overviews of different programs to assist eye care patients:

 

EyeSmart

The EyeSmartTM public awareness campaign empowers Americans to take charge of their eye health. EyeSmart emphasizes the need for Americans to know their risk factors for eye diseases, infections and injuries, and how ophthalmologists can help prevent, diagnose and treat eye conditions. The campaign is sponsored by the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the world's largest association of eye physicians and surgeons.


 

EyeCare America

Founded in 1985, EyeCare America is a public service foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Its mission is to reduce avoidable blindness and severe visual impairment by raising awareness about eye disease and care, providing free eye health educational materials and facilitating access to medical eye care. In addition to its online educational materials, it offer multiple eye care programs for which individuals may qualify.


 

Ohio Amblyope Registry

The Ohio Amblyope Registry is a statewide program designed to serve the needs of Ohio's children with amblyopia, commonly known as lazy eye, their families and eye doctors. It is a voluntary registration program to increase knowledge about amblyopia, its treatment and prevention. All services provided by the registry are free of charge.


 

Prevent Blindness Ohio

Prevent Blindness is dedicated to addressing the challenge to prevent blindness and preserve sight through wise investment of community support. Prevent Blindness has served more than 800,000 Ohioans this year through outreach and education designed to connect those in need to critical sight-saving resources. 


 

Caring Partners International

Caring Partners International accepts donated ophthalmological equipment to help those in need in underserved countries, including Cuba, Nicaragua, Ecuador, and Guatemala. Caring Partners is a Trans-denominational Christian Medical Ministry.


 

IEP Eye Exams

Amended Substitute House Bill 95 passed in 2003 requires students initially identified with disabilities to have an eye exam. The requirement started in the fall of 2004. If you would like more information about HB 95 and the eye exam requirements for Special Education Students, visit www.iepeyeexam.org